CLOUD CONTROL

CLOUD CONTROL

Body Parts, WILD ONES

Tuesday 1/21

8:00 pm

$10.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is all ages

There's a 6 ticket limit for this event per household, customer, credit card number and email address. Patrons who exceed the ticket limit can have their order cancelled automatically and without notice.

CLOUD CONTROL
CLOUD CONTROL
Hey, we’re Cloud Control. We met in High School. We grew up in the Blue Mountains and we always get asked about that. It might influence us a little bit being from there, maybe it just makes us more chilled. We got together to enter a band competition and we weren’t that great but somehow there was always something that kept us going – community radio, local clubs, friends we made on the scene and the desire to make a record that we would listen to.

In 2011 our first album Bliss Release won the Australian Music Prize (like the Mercury but more antipodean) and we’ve been touring ever since. In the last year we played at festivals like Reading, Leeds, SXSW, Latitude, Field Day, Splendour in the Grass and more all over the world. Apart from going it alone we’ve supported some really great bands like Vampire Weekend, Arcade Fire, Local Natives, Supergrass and The Drums.

"The psyched-out artwork and the "free 1960s fonts" logo on Cloud Control's debut album, 2011's Bliss Release (also: the title), pretty much told you what was going on inside the box before you heard a note: their woozy Tame Impala-meets-Fleet Foxes vibe came as no surprise. What is refreshing is that the first single from the follow-up (Dream Cave, due this fall) sees the band shut its shared third-eye to focus somewhere a little more present: namely, the romantic, professional, and personal fuck-ups of singer Alister Wright. "Dojo Rising" is a fine downer hymn, a small, grey, circling cloud of tremulous guitar and steady, splattering cymbals. ... Dream Cave is released in the U.S. on September 17 via Votiv." --Pitchfork
Body Parts
Body Parts
Body Parts mobilizes a singularly elegant experimental pop idiom to explore the contours of modern devotion and doctrines of self-improvement alongside the immoderate reverberations of remembrance. Weaving together influences as varied as the rationalist prescriptions of the self-made seeker-healer- Scientology mastermind L. Ron Hubbard, the sensual guitar-scapes of Prince, and the haunting vocals and surrealist melodrama of Kate Bush, Ryder Bach and Alina Cutrono form the group’s core.

In addition to nimble guitar work and impeccable vocals, Bach and Cutrono bring years of experience in theater, dance, and performance to the front flank of Body Parts’ robust live show and captivating music videos. The vital rhythmic infrastructure and frankly infectious groove found both live and on the album comes thanks to the formidable duo of Raymond Proudfoot, bass and Taylor Dexter, drums. Newcomer Derek Coburn on keys and synthesizer completes their superlative live sound.
WILD ONES
WILD ONES
In late 2012, Wild Ones was on the verge of collapse. Guitarist Clayton Knapp had blown out an eardrum, the band's original drummer left the group and his replacement, Seve Sheldon, was in the hospital with a punctured lung, practicing songs on a drum pad with a tube sticking out of his chest. The band's members had funneled all of their money into a debut record, Keep It Safe, that had taken a year to write and nine months to record and mix. Fans and followers began to wonder if that record would ever see the light of day. It was make-or-break time. Wild Ones made. Instead of folding in the face of financial drama, injuries and personnel changes, Wild Ones took a deep breath and adjusted to its new surroundings. This band is used to adjusting. Since its formation in 2010, Wild Ones has insisted on operating as a DIY collective. The band recorded and mixed its debut as a group (with help from engineer David Pollock). Sometimes considering each members' opinion meant endless revisits and tweaks to the album's tracks. The process was time-consuming, but it was also worth it. "That was a reaction to the bands we had been in before," says lead vocalist Danielle Sullivan. "This band was born out of our desire to have a democratic, all-inclusive music-making process." Going it alone—even the artwork on Keep It Safe was created by Wild Ones keyboardist Thomas Himes—comes with its fair share of challenges. Most of Wild Ones' debut was recorded in a two-story East Portland warehouse rehearsal space, where the band was surrounded on all sides by rock acts like Quasi and the Thermals. Wild Ones would get to their practice space around 8 am to record, often grabbing quick takes between thunderous drum solos from down the hall. "Somewhere on the record, if you listen close enough, you can probably hear the metal band next door," Himes says. "When we went in that room in March, it was raining," says Knapp. "When we finished recording in October, it was raining." Keep It Safe, the album that finally emerged after well over a year of gestation, is bigger than the sum of its meticulously gathered parts. Even now, the band's sound continues to evolve. Wild Ones' members come from vastly disparate musical backgrounds—guitarist Nick Vicario was a Portland punk icon long before he turned 18; bassist Max Stein is a classical composer—and all of their experiences inform pop music that is influenced by everything from german techno to American R&B. These are sounds that don't usually come packaged together, but in the able hands of Wild Ones, they seem like a perfectly natural fit.
Venue Information:
Rickshaw Stop
155 Fell St
San Francisco, CA, 94102
http://rickshawstop.com