CAMP COPE

CAMP COPE

An Horse, Oceanator

Sunday 5/12

7:00 pm

$15.00

This event is all ages

*Orders place for the sole purpose of resale will be cancelled. Orders exceeding the 6 ticket limit subject to cancellation.*

 

CAMP COPE
CAMP COPE
Camp Cope have become somewhat of a force in music since forming in a Melbourne backyard over home job tattoos a few years ago.

Shortly after the release of their acclaimed self-titled debut album, Camp Cope launched the It Takes One campaign to say enough is enough: no more sexual and physical assault at shows. The widely-covered campaign continues to drive conversation around safe spaces at live music events, including the implementation of an ongoing safe spaces Hotline initiative at Laneway Festival in Australia.

They’re a band whose work far extends that which happens on stage, or in the recording studio. They use their resilience and strength to fight for the betterment for the music industry and related communities, and have proven that they aren’t afraid to put their heads on the chopping block to do so.

They share this experience on their acclaimed sophomore album How to Socialise & Make Friends (2018). It features the standout opener ‘The Opener’, a rally cry which called the music industry to task on its sexist and inequitable structures, and ‘The Face of God’, a harrowing account of sexual assault at the hands of someone whose art you admire, a song that “proved to be the most fearless and powerful thing the Melbourne trio could possibly do” (Noisey).

And you can feel it, too. The energy at a Camp Cope show is rare. Not just because they write good songs that have the audience on their feet. They’re a band that takes action – they say no, they stand their ground, they take up space, and the audience can feel the power from those words. They unite in a space that is truly equal as they scream back every word, arms in the air, veins pulsating. You can feel it in the air. It doesn’t just feel a show – it feels like an uprising.
An Horse
An Horse
An Horse is Kate Cooper and Damon Cox. They're from Brisbane, Australia.
Oceanator
Oceanator
Elise Okusami has been a musician since the tender age of 9 years old when she first learned to play guitar. Her current force of nature quality is clearly inspired by a lifelong intense passion for music. In the 4th grade, soon after learning guitar, Okusami started her first band with her brother and a few friends. She hasn’t slowed since then, also having drummed for multiple projects in New York. As she eventually grew into her solo musical endeavor, Oceanator, Okusami has exemplified the sheer power of her project’s namesake through and through.

The influence of her upbringing in 90’s grunge and punk is evident in Okusami’s introspective songwriting. This thoughtful lyricism is put into practice through brooding post-rock ballads like “Coming Home” and “Tell Me” and intense yet danceable synthy indie tracks like “Not Around.” Additionally, Okusami can often be heard engaging with some of the most deeply moving and existential questions of life in her work. A prime example of such a question would be ‘What does it mean to be human?’, which can be heard being contemplated in “Inhuman.” While there surely is a range to Oceanator’s stylistic approaches from song to song, the tremendous powerhouse nature of the project is felt consistently throughout each and every song on Lows.
Venue Information:
Rickshaw Stop
155 Fell St
San Francisco, CA, 94102
http://rickshawstop.com