THE BLOW / EMA (co-headline)

THE BLOW / EMA (co-headline)

Ah Mer Ah Su

Monday 10/30

8:00 pm

$15.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is all ages

6 ticket limit per customer/account/household/email/credit card/address. Orders exceeding the 6 ticket limit subject to cancellation. Orders place for the sole purpose of resale will be cancelled.

THE BLOW
THE BLOW
The Blow (Melissa Dyne and Khaela Maricich) have spent the past many years building a system for massaging atmosphere. Specifically and technically: they have been manipulating sound and light waves in raw forms, using electroacoustic production tools and analog video synths. Emotionally and metaphysically: they have been constructing a world for themselves to live in. From a thrust of both curiosity and financial necessity, the duo found themselves working together in isolation in series of remote locations around the United States. Installing their portable studio in these places (a defunct ski resort in northern Georgia, for example) they confronted a variety of unwelcoming atmospheres. Through the process of developing their instruments and methods of producing sound and light projection, they massaged the airs around them, changing the qualities of the spaces and making spheres of atmosphere that were more habitable for existence. As the greater atmosphere of the country has slanted towards being more unwelcoming to general existence, this skill set has proven beneficial.

ENERGETIC STRATEGIES (For Right Now) brings The Blow’s sphere of atmosphere to twenty locations across the United States throughout fall of 2018. Dyne and Maricich will install their sound production rig and visual apparatuses into each venue, continuing and expanding on their long-running practice of weaving together popular music, performance art, sound and light installation and experimental composition. They will offer strategies for surviving, possibly thriving within, the air (right now).

Coinciding with the announcement of the ENERGETIC STRATEGIES tour, The Blow are releasing a video for their 11 minute song, “The Bath.” The video is a satellite version of The Blow’s ambulatory atmosphere, accessible from any online location. “The Bath” video was shot in a live performance, from inside of their production sphere, which was installed at The Fuga artist residency at Etopia Center for Art and Technology, in Zaragoza, Spain in June 2018.
EMA
EMA
After the success of Past Life Martyred Saints and 2014’s prophetic The Future’s Void, EMA retreated to a basement in Portland, Oregon – a generic apartment complex in a non-trendy neighborhood, with beige carpeting and cheap slat blinds.

She returns with a portrait of a world both familiar and alien: The Outer Ring, a pitch-black world of half-empty subdivisions, American flags hung over basement windows, big-box stores and strip malls and rage. In a year dominated by working-class alienation, EMA — a Midwesterner who has never lost her thousand-yard stare — has delivered an album that renders American poverty and resentment with frightening realism and deep empathy.

The Outer Ring is the suburban world of people who’ve been pushed out of city centers by stagnating wages and rising expense, forced up against rural communities swallowed by sprawl. It’s far more diverse than traditional images of “the suburbs” – vape shops and living-room hair salons exist next to Mexican grocery stores and Dollar General. But it’s also more deeply marked by poverty and tension, and by the anger that comes from having your story and your struggles erased from the narrative.

Songs like “I Wanna Destroy” (which shares a title with her 2015 MoMA PS1 exhibition) and “Down & Out” flicker between self-loathing and nihilism — an anger born of pain from being neglected by those in power, but no less alarming when we realize that “the kids from the void” might burn the world down.

The voices we hear in these songs — druggy, surly societal outcasts; Byronic blue-collar nihilists bringing down fire — speak to a rebellion that’s typically reserved for men. Think Bruce Springsteen’s similarly bleak outlaw portraits in Nebraska, or the quintessentially American (and quintessentially dudely) voices of Jack Kerouac or Charles Bukowski.
Ah Mer Ah Su
Ah Mer Ah Su
Star Amerasu (AH-MER-AH-SU) started singing at a young age.

She is a multi-instrumentalist, singer, dancer, actor.

Her work spans many genres. She has performed all over the world.

She is here to change the world through her art.
Venue Information:
Rickshaw Stop
155 Fell St
San Francisco, CA, 94102
http://rickshawstop.com