CRYSTAL STILTS

CRYSTAL STILTS

Angel Island, The Mantles

Sat, May 7, 2011

9:00 pm

Rickshaw Stop

$10.00 - $12.00

This event is all ages

Adv tix $10/ doors $12

CRYSTAL STILTS
CRYSTAL STILTS
Back in 2008, a lot of heads turned to clock Crystal Stilts’ Alight Of Night, their first album after a string of here-today-gone-tomorrow singles and EPs. It wasn’t exactly a surprise – Crystal Stilts felt like part of a new age dawning, of underground collectives and random, crazy groups who’d rediscovered the joys of noise-pop and set about creating their own Creations – but there was something unique about Crystal Stilts, something hermetic yet gorgeous about the world they created. With their new Slumberland Records album, In Love With Oblivion, they stretch things further still, honing their songcraft, indulging their more strung-out sides, full of elliptical verses and perfectly chiming guitars, cranky pop organs and the punkest of rhythms. It’s a perfect blend of pop smarts and beguiling experiment. The best songs on In Love With Oblivion are effortless, rapturous – “Through The Floor” burns on fevered energy; “Silver Sun” kisses the air with a beautiful stream of jangle guitar; “Alien Rivers” is a spooked, psychedelic requiem, roughly Opal’s Happy Nightmare Baby + 14 Iced Bears’ “Mother Sleep” x Victor Dimisich Band. (But that was my math, not theirs.) “Precarious Stair” is my favourite girl-pop-song-not-actually-fronted-by-a-girl since, I dunno, “Just Like Honey."

“This is one of the best garage pop sides since The Chills’ own Brave Words.” –-The Wire

“Quite simply, Alight Of Night is one of the most breathtaking records these ears have been partial to in a long while, and even if Crystal Stilts never make another record, their legacy is assured.” –-Drowned In Sound

“One of the year’s best albums.” –-Brooklyn Vegan
Angel Island
Angel Island
"The frontman for Angel Island, Justin Goldman, has one of those voices that feels right at home taking on spidery melodies about heartbreak. One part Andrew Goldfarb (the Slow Poisoner) and one part Brett Anderson (Suede), Goldman’s voice leads the charge on churning potboilers like 'Kicking & Screaming' as well as more uptempo, tambourine-driven fare like 'What It Means, Where It All Comes From.' Recommended if you like the sounds of their Shit Krystal labelmates, Billy & Dolly." --Noise Pop
The Mantles
The Mantles
San Francisco/Oakland’s The Mantles have been charting a unique path through the Bay Area’s storied garage/pop scene since 2007. The early shows were loose & loud Velvets/Nuggets-bashing, always with weirdly catchy songs & oddball chord changes. Their first singles saw them honing their sound, building towards their excellent 2009 self-titled debut album (on Siltbreeze) and follow-up EP on Mexican Summer. Loosely aligning with artists like White Fence and Ty Segall, The Mantles thoroughly modernize and personalize the folk-rock tradition.

Now on Long Enough To Leave,The Mantles still color outside the lines but dial a cleaner, more infectious sound. SF’s Kelley Stoltz (Sub Pop) recorded the new album with enough savvy to make it pop while keeping the performances idiosyncratic & affecting. Sharp ears may spot bits of early Love, New Zealand’s Flying Nun label and LA’s Paisley Underground, but The Mantles are very far from revivalists and have more song-writing and arranging skill at their disposal than many bands could hope to have.

"The Mantles is the kind of album that defies expectations. Its shades of New Zealand-ry (an organ sound and laconic vocal delivery not far from Flying Nun groups such as the Chills and the Verlaines), its Paisley Underground touches (some reviewers have mentioned Steve Wynn and Dream Syndicate), and its better-than-NME's-C86-cassette pop appeal seem very au courant, but come across as natural as breathing. ... the Byrds-y jangle of 'Disappearing Act'; the churning propulsive energy of 'What We Do Matters'; and maybe most of all, the brooding balladry of 'Look Away,' a now-I-see-you-now-I-don't relationship ode which possesses a kind of offhand melodic and vocal strength that sounds easy to achieve, but obviously isn't, because so few ever manage to do it." --SF Bay Guardian

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Venue Information:
Rickshaw Stop
155 Fell St
San Francisco, CA, 94102
http://rickshawstop.com